Power Plant Technology

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Practical... Possible... Pierpont
2013 - 2014 Academic Catalog

Power Plant Technology

  • Associate in Applied Science (AAS)

Furr, Douglas

Program Coordinator of Power Plant Technology
Instructor, Specialized Certifications
304-367-4911
411 Engineering Technology Building
Locust Avenue Campus, Fairmont
Program Purpose: 

This program is designed to meet the needs of First Energy and other local and regional power producers.  The program provides entry and mid-level replacement personnel for First Energy generating facilities and also supplies an available workforce to other local and regional utilities and industries.  Technical and academic courses are offered through Pierpont Community and Technical College.  A limited amount of internships are provided by First Energy on a competitive basis.

Student Learning Outcomes: 

Pierpont Community & Technical College’s motto of “Practical, Possible, Pierpont” focuses on creating practical learning experiences, while increasing employment opportunities for our graduates. By incorporating mathematics, physics, communication skills, computer technology, professional and industry safety standards to real-life learning experiences, graduates of the Power Plant Technology program will become successful entry level power plant operators.

Upon successful completion of the Power Plant Technology A.A.S. degree program, graduates will be able to:

  • Use written and spoken English effectively and professionally.
  • Use a computer to perform work-specific duties.
  • Apply mathematics and physics as a means of solving problems in the work environment.
  • Apply appropriate safety precautions when working with various tools, machinery, or processes.
  • Interpret schematic drawings of, use appropriate measuring devices for, and demonstrate the ability to perform basic troubleshooting of fluid and electrical systems.
  • Perform entry level and routine duties as a plant operator at electrical power generating facilities.
  • Operate hand and power tools to repair electrical and mechanical systems.
  • Appreciate the diversity found in the field of Power Plant Technology and how lifelong learning will be instrumental to career advancement within the industry.
  • Demonstrate basic workplace skills and responsibilities, including punctuality, etiquette and courtesy, and teamwork.
Opportunities: 

Graduates of the Power Plant Technology Program may accept positions in the electrical power generating industry within plant operations and maintenance departments.  Graduates may also find placement in water treatment facilities, chemical processing facilities, and other industrial facilities that use components and systems that are similar to those used in power generating stations. 

The electrical power industry as a whole projects that approximately 50% of their workforce will be retiring in the next 3-5 years.  Conservatively, this equates to approximately 150-200 jobs at local power generating facilities, which should become available within in that time frame.

Professions within the electrical power generation sector are among the highest paying, and most stable professions in the country.  The average starting wage of a plant operator or maintenance technician is approximately $40,000-$45,000 per year.  It is not uncommon for individuals to progress through the ranks and make $80,000 – $100,000 per year within their first 3-5 years of employment.   Generally speaking, electrical power generation workers stay employed at the same location throughout their career.

Program Specific Admission Requirements: 

Students need to have a score of 19 or better in the MATH portion of the ACT or SAT equivalent or 36 or better on the COMPASS Algebra test or have completed the MATH 0081-0086 series.  Students need to have a score of 18 or better in the English portion of the ACT or SAT equivalent or a 71 or better on the COMPASS test or have completed ENGL 0097 or ENGL 0098.

Program Specific Enrollment Requirements: 

Program Assessment:

Written exams, homework assignments, written reports and oral presentations will be used to assess course and program cognitive outcomes.  Lab exercises and evaluations, simulator evaluations, and troubleshooting exercises will be used to evaluate performance objectives.

Program Total Credit Hours: 
64 CHs
Support Coursework: 
15 CHs

ENGL 1005

Written English for Industry
3
CH(s)

INFO 1100

Computer Concepts and Applications
3
CH(s)
Program Specific Required Coursework: 
49 CHs

ENRG 2050

Emerging Energy Technologies
3
CH(s)

PWPL 1160

Power Plant Fundamentals, Components & Theory
3
CH(s)

PWPL 1162

Plant Water Chemistry, Cooling, Fuel & Coombustion Air Systems
3
CH(s)

PWPL 1172

Power Plant Instrumentation & Control
3
CH(s)

PWPL 1174

Advanced Power Plant Systems
3
CH(s)

PWPL 1995

Power Plant Capstone (Internship)
6
CH(s)

*PWPL 1994 may be substituted for PWPL 1995 for those who are not eligible to take the course.

Model Schedule
Fall Semester

PWPL 1160

Power Plant Fundamentals, Components & Theory
3
CH(s)

PWPL 1172

Power Plant Instrumentation & Control
3
CH(s)
Total Credit Hours: 
15 CHs
Spring Semester

ENGL 1005

Written English for Industry
3
CH(s)

PWPL 1162

Plant Water Chemistry, Cooling, Fuel & Coombustion Air Systems
3
CH(s)

PWPL 1174

Advanced Power Plant Systems
3
CH(s)
Total Credit Hours: 
15 CHs

*PWPL 1162, PWPL 1174, PWPL 1179 must be taken simultaneously (co-requisites).

Summer I Semester

PWPL 1995

Power Plant Capstone (Internship)
6
CH(s)
Total Credit Hours: 
6 CHs

*PWPL 1994 may be substituted for PWPL 1995 for those who are not eligible to take the course.

Fall Semester
Total Credit Hours: 
13 CHs
Spring Semester

ENRG 2050

Emerging Energy Technologies
3
CH(s)

INFO 1100

Computer Concepts and Applications
3
CH(s)
Total Credit Hours: 
15 CHs
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